Redbridge art project brings Bangladeshi culture to wider audience

The Redbridge-based artist Mukta Chakravarty has launched the Canvas Story art project which exlores Bangladeshi's rich...

The Redbridge-based artist Mukta Chakravarty has launched the Canvas Story art project which exlores Bangladeshi's rich cultural heritage. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty - Credit: Archant

A Redbridge-based artist is showcasing the rich Bangladeshi culture to a wider audience through an art project, thanks to a commission from the Arts Council and a National Lottery grant.

The project was commissioned by Arts Council England along with a grant from National lottery. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty

The project was commissioned by Arts Council England along with a grant from National lottery. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty - Credit: Archant

The British-Bangladeshi artist Mukta Chakravarty, who goes by Mouni Mukta, has launched a six-month-long art project entitled Canvas Story: Narrating British Bangladeshi cultural heritage to enhance cultural resilience which aims to integrate Bangladesh’s cultural heritage into the wider art scene.

Mukta set about the online project since she felt that not enough was being done to preserve and promote Bangladeshi culture, particularly to young people of Bengali heritage born and raised in this country.

The project focuses on three aspects of Bangladeshi culture - Nouka Baich (boat race), Manosamangol (a medieval Bengali epic) and Dol Utsab (festival of colours).

She incorporated these three aspects into three paintings and scripts for three short films.


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Mukta said she has wanted to work on an art project exploring Bangladesh’s culture for a long time because she felt her culture and history were being eroded over time.

She said: “Many young people of Bengali heritage, including those born and raised in Britain, are losing a sense of their cultural identity.

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“This makes it vital to celebrate and reinforce the thousand-year-old aesthetic cultural heritage of Bengal.”

As part of the wider discussion the artist is holding six online seminars with researchers, academics and representatives from the community to discuss the issues brought up by the art project.

As part of the project Mukta is releasing three paintings and three short films. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty

As part of the project Mukta is releasing three paintings and three short films. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty - Credit: Archant

Ilford South MP Sam Tarry attended the first virtual seminar on December 5 along with commonwealth scholar Sudip Chakraborty and writer and film director Leesa Gazi.

Mr Tarry said he felt the project was particularly significant for young people to learn about their ancestry, heritage and culture.

He said: “When you know where you are coming from, I believe it will help you to know where you are going.”

The first of the three films launched this weekend with the second film premiering in January and the third in March.

One aspect she is exploring in her project is Dol Utsab, the festival of colours.Picture: Mukta Chakravarty

One aspect she is exploring in her project is Dol Utsab, the festival of colours.Picture: Mukta Chakravarty - Credit: Archant

For more information visit facebook.com/mounimukta

There will be six online seminars to discuss the wider aspects of the project, the first of which took place this weekend...

There will be six online seminars to discuss the wider aspects of the project, the first of which took place this weekend with Ilford South MP Sam Tarry. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty - Credit: Archant

A close-up one of the paintings. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty

A close-up one of the paintings. Picture: Mukta Chakravarty - Credit: Archant

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