Son of tragic Barkingside GP vows to fight for answers

A SON is continuing his fight to hold someone responsible for the loss of his mum’s medical records.

The Recorder first reported in May on the case of popular GP Sugithravalli Davie, who died following a routine blood transfusion in 2007.

After doubts were raised about her sudden death, her family were told her medical records had been lost.

Dr Davie, a GP at Fullwell Cross Medical Centre, Tomswood Hill, Barkingside, was being treated for multiple myeloma at St Barts Hospital, London, and was in the early stages of her illness.

A post-mortem gave the cause as bronchopneumonia and, said son Paul, of Stainforth Road, Newbury Park, a condition called acute pulmonary oedema - fluid accumulation in the lungs - was also listed.


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Mr Davie said he was told by a doctor that bronchopneumonia should have been picked up earlier, so he requested to see her medical records.

The 36-year-old was left bewildered when he told they had been lost, less than four weeks after she died.

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He said: “We’re not talking about small records, this would have been a massive file.”

Dr Sugi’s family say they have never been able to hold anyone accountable for the loss because records of dead patients are not protected under the data protection act.

Mr Davie said: “We’ve never been able to answer questions over mum’s death.

“If a person’s records are lost when they are alive, whoever is responsible can be found negligible.

“But this doesn’t apply in the case of patients who are deceased.”

Mr Davie has enlisted the help of Ilford South MP Mike Gapes, who plans to lobby parliament for a change in the law.

Around 100 doctors have signed a petition calling for the change and the family is considering taking their case to the European courts.

A spokesman for Barts and The London NHS Trust has apologised for the loss and said extensive efforts have been made to locate the records.

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