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Seven Kings campaigners, who feel ‘betrayed’ by Crossrail, stage a rally on anniversary of Paralympics

PUBLISHED: 14:03 06 September 2013 | UPDATED: 14:03 06 September 2013

One year on from the Paralympics, Transport for All hosted its own Legacy Torch Relay along the route of the Crossrail line to promote the importance of step-free access.

One year on from the Paralympics, Transport for All hosted its own Legacy Torch Relay along the route of the Crossrail line to promote the importance of step-free access.

Archant

Campaigners stepped up their fight to see lifts installed at Seven Kings train station after being “betrayed” by Crossrail officials, on the one year anniversary of the Paralympic Torch Relay.

John Elliffe carried the torch from Seven Kings station.John Elliffe carried the torch from Seven Kings station.

Organised by Transport for All, residents and councillors met at the station in High Road on Thursday, to make a stance on the lack of step free access in light of the Paralympic legacy.

Mark Kennedy, from Seven Kings & Newbury Park Residents Association, said: “Today is a special day in making the Crossrail officials aware of the public feeling of being let down and betrayed with promises of a lift installed at Seven Kings as part of the Crossrail project.

“Lifts are important and are needed not just for disabled, but the elderly, people with walking difficulties, those with luggage and parents and carers with young children in buggies and prams.”

The relay travelled the route of the Crossrail line by bus, to the company’s head offices in Canary Wharf.

Mr Kennedy added: “Officials need to reassess their decision not to install lifts at Seven Kings, perform a U-turn in their plans and ensure that this station is made accessible for all to use.”

The association is already lobbying the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson and Transport for London’s managing director, Mike Brown, to install a lift at Newbury Park Tube station.

Seven Kings ward Cllr Bob Littlewood said: “There are a lot of people, and not just those who use a wheelchair, that are discouraged from using the station because there is no step-free access.

“We must give everyone equal rights to use public transport and not discriminate. Despite all the fuss about the cost of putting in a lift, I have been told by an engineer that it could be done overnight.”

Mike Brown said the “aim” was to make the whole Crossrail route accessible and “work is underway to look at practical solutions and funding options” for the seven stations without step-free access.


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