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Holi 2019: Redbridge revellers splash coloured powder to mark start of spring

PUBLISHED: 15:00 26 March 2019 | UPDATED: 09:26 27 March 2019

Holi Celebrations in Goodmayes Park. Photo by Ellie Hoskins.

Holi Celebrations in Goodmayes Park. Photo by Ellie Hoskins.

Ellie Hoskins Photographer www.elliehoskins.com ellie@elliehoskins.com

Across the borough worshippers have been coating each other in vibrant colours to celebrate the festival of Holi.

More than 250 revellers gathered near the tennis court in Goodmayes Park, High Road, to usher in spring on Saturday, March 23.

Families danced, ate food and plastered each other in coloured powder, known as gulal, as Bollywood songs blared from a sound system.

The event was organised by Shubham London, a community group based in the south of the borough.

Committee member Deepak Shukla said: “We started celebrating Holi with only 30 people around 13 years ago. Now we have around 250 who come every year to celebrate Holi.

“It marks the beginning of spring back in India. Now people celebrate across the globe.”

He added: “This is the beginning of a new life. Like we have Easter in England, this is the Easter more or less of India.”

The gulal also symbolises the new colours that are brought to nature through the coming of spring.

Recorder reader Ruchika Bharti also sent in photos of her celebration with friends and family at home.

Shivangi, five taking part in Holi Celebrations in Goodmayes Park. Photo by Ellie Hoskins.Shivangi, five taking part in Holi Celebrations in Goodmayes Park. Photo by Ellie Hoskins.

“We missed India but it is always good to celebrate Holi with friends,” she told the Recorder.

Holi festivities takes place every year, beginning on the evening of the full moon that comes in the Hindu month of Phalguna, which falls between the end of February and the middle of March, and carrying on into the next day.

This year Holi fell on March 20 and 21.

Revellers throw coloured powder over each other, in part to symbolise the love between Hindu god Krishna and goddess Radha.

Holi Celebrations in Goodmayes Park. Photo by Ellie Hoskins.Holi Celebrations in Goodmayes Park. Photo by Ellie Hoskins.

According to one of the more popular stories of the festival’s origins, Krishna was embarrassed about his blue skin and worried his love Radha would not accept him.

Krishna was instructed by his mother to cover Radha’s face in whichever colour he wanted.

When he did, they fell in love.


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