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Funeral of Redbridge Music Society chairman Colin Pryke to take place this week

PUBLISHED: 14:16 20 January 2016 | UPDATED: 16:33 20 January 2016

Colin Pryke, right, who was one of the first members of Redbridge Music Society and chairman for more than 30 years has passed away aged 82. Photo: Redbridge Music Society

Colin Pryke, right, who was one of the first members of Redbridge Music Society and chairman for more than 30 years has passed away aged 82. Photo: Redbridge Music Society

Archant

The funeral of one of the first members of Redbridge Music Society – and its chairman for more than 30 years – will take place on Friday.

Colin Pryke, of Hazeldene Road, Goodmayes, died on Boxing Day aged 82 in King George Hospital after a prolonged battle with illness.

His funeral will take place at the City of London Crematorium, in Manor Park, at 11.30am.

He was born in Ilford on September 29 1933, and lived in Goodmayes his entire life.

Colin’s passion for music started at a very young age, particularly in classical music and operas.

At the age of 13 he went to the first of many, seeing The Barber of Seville by Gioachino Rossini.

In 1949 Colin joined Goodmayes and District Gramophone Society, which became Redbridge Music Society, shortly after its formation.

He was elected to the committee a year later aged just 17, and went on to hold the position of chairman for more than 30 years.

Current secretary David Bird said: “Over the years he was a major driving force behind the society.

“He helped pioneer the music society’s Youth Musical Appreciation Development Scheme, which provides free entrance to musical events for students and under 16s within the borough.”

Colin was heavily involved in organising public concerts in Redbridge, and for many years was the music representative on Redbridge Arts Council.

He was a chemistry teacher at Harold Hill Grammar School, in Havering, and used to give talks to the students about the importance of music.

Colin also had an incredibly large collection of original wax 78 RPM vinyls, which he used to joke was bigger than the BBC’s.

David Bird added: “He contributed enormously to keeping the society going - often through difficult financial times - and to making music available and accessible to the people of the borough.

“He was much respected for his musical knowledge and his tenacious spirit and he will be sadly missed.”


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