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Seven Kings education ambassadors meet ex Prime Minister Gordon Brown

PUBLISHED: 10:58 13 December 2010

Navdeep Bual (left) and Yasir Yeahia, from Seven Kings High School, with Gordon Brown

Navdeep Bual (left) and Yasir Yeahia, from Seven Kings High School, with Gordon Brown

Archant

TWO pupils who spearheaded a campaign for better education around the world were given the seal of approval from ex Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Navdeep Bual and Yasir Yeahia, who attend Seven Kings High School in Ley Street, Ilford, were nominated for the post of education ambassador by their teacher Jeremy Davison for their commitment and interest in achieving better education resources globally, after seeing first hand the importance of learning from older generations of their families.
Navdeep told the judges of the Steve Sinnott award for Young Global Education how she had seen the changes in education. “In only one generation, my family has gone from working on a farm to becoming engineers and lawyers,” she said.

The accolade was set up in memory of National Union of Teachers General Steve Sinnott, a passionate campaigner for better education.
The year 10 students will hold the post for one year, and are set to travel to Bolivia to see the delivery of education in a third world county.

The 14-year-old students met former Labour Prime Minister Gordon Brown last week in London following their appointment as education ambassadors.

“He asked us what we wanted to do when we were older,” said Navdeep. “I said I wanted to be the Secretary General of the United States!”
“He told me that I would be the first woman to do that if I did achieve my dream.”

Yasir said they were set to meet Prime Minister David Cameron after their Bolivia trip.
“When we come back, we are going to a National Union of Teachers conference where we will discuss the findings of our trip.”

The pair are using social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook to get across news of their campaign - an idea which won them much favour among the judges.

“We found these websites were popular,” said. “We tried to use them to raise public awareness, the judges said it was an innovative idea.”

Twitter link/ Facebook link.



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