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Elderly Whipps Cross Hospital patient ‘faced a number of problems’ says Redbridge health watchdog

PUBLISHED: 14:02 05 July 2017 | UPDATED: 10:41 10 July 2017

File photo dated 22/04/08 of Whipps Cross University Hospital in Walthamstow, east London, as the already under-fire hospital was rated inadequate after inspectors found a raft of problems including patients experiencing delays in their treatment and not enough nursing and medical staff to ensure safe care was provided.

File photo dated 22/04/08 of Whipps Cross University Hospital in Walthamstow, east London, as the already under-fire hospital was rated inadequate after inspectors found a raft of problems including patients experiencing delays in their treatment and not enough nursing and medical staff to ensure safe care was provided.

PA Wire/Press Association Images

A 78-year-old woman who fractured her ankles and was admitted to Whipps Cross Hospital said she “felt like throwing herself under a bus.”

Known only as Mrs H, her journey from being admitted to discharged at the hospital, in Leytonstone, has been chronicled by watchdog Healthwatch Redbridge.

In a report, which is set to be discussed by the health scrutiny committee at Redbridge Town Hall tonight, it says she faced “a number of additional problem with the services at Whipps Cross Hospital in regards to appointments, communication between departments and a lack of information.”

Healthwatch Redbridge, which works to champion the voice of patients, was contacted by the woman as she was facing problems regarding her discharge.

The first time a representative visited her, she was distressed about losing her mobility, and informed the charity: “I feel like throwing myself under a bus,

“I can’t go on like this.”

The report notes that Leyton & Wanstead MP John Cryer became involved by contacting services on Mrs H’s behalf.

Barts Health NHS Trust, which runs the hospital, says that the case has been discussed “to ensure this does not happen again.”

A spokeswoman said: “We apologise for the instances when the care given to Mrs H fell below the high standard that we aim to provide.

“The process for non weight-bearing patients is now fully embedded, and our medical team are aware of the details.

“In addition, our staff in the therapies team have discussed ways to more clearly communicate with patients and partner organisations to improve quality and their experience.”

The document highlights Healthwatch Redbridge’s efforts to assess the effectiveness of hospital discharge procedures.

Although it says some of its support of Mrs H “was technically outside of our remit”, it added that it allowed the service the opportunity to review the complete discharge pathway.

Healthwatch Redbridge, which published its annual report last Friday, says it has seen a large growth in the number of people who engaged with it.

Commenting on the annual report, Cathy Turland, chief executive officer said she was very proud of the service.

She said: “We continue to develop our approaches to engagement and inclusion and work with local people to recognise how we can improve services through involvement and engagement.

“We are proud that our work is driving real change and improvement for people in Redbridge. By working together with commissioners and providers we are ensuring the views and experiences of patients are being used to make services better.

“My thanks to our volunteers, staff, board and supporting stakeholders for their commitment, support, and involvement over the past year.”


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