Woodford Green teacher is nominated for national biology award

Head of Biology at Woodford County High School Katie Estruch is one of three finalists for Biology t

Head of Biology at Woodford County High School Katie Estruch is one of three finalists for Biology teacher of the Year - Credit: Archant

A Woodford Green biology teacher shortlisted for a national award says victory will show “all the hard work will have paid off”.

Head of Biology at Woodford County High School Katie Estruch is one of three finalists for Biology t

Head of Biology at Woodford County High School Katie Estruch is one of three finalists for Biology teacher of the Year - Credit: Archant

Woodford County High School’s Katie Estruch is among three nominees for the Royal Society of Biology’s School Biology Teacher of the Year 2017.

The 29-year-old now has to submit a case study on how she has enhanced her students’ learning, and could win £500 for herself as well as £500 of Oxford University Press supplies for the High Road school.

She told the Recorder: “I was looking through the awards for students when I saw the teacher category and decided to apply.

“If I do win it would be a fantastic opportunity to feel all the hard work will have paid off.

Head of Biology at Woodford County High School Katie Estruch is one of three finalists for Biology t

Head of Biology at Woodford County High School Katie Estruch is one of three finalists for Biology teacher of the Year - Credit: Archant


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“It would be something to measure more than results I would be really proud.”

Ms Estruch, of Debden, Essex, first got into teaching after studying biology at university, when she visited the school her mother worked at.

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After studying her PGCE she taught at two other schools before becoming head of biology at Woodford County High.

She had to provide examples of innovative teaching, and explained how she had got the students to create DNA structures using jelly babies.

Ms Estruch had also helped her pupils create animations of the genetic material using their camera phones.

And she said she hoped to inspire her pupils at the all girls school into jobs in science.

“STEM is a very big focus at our school, we have a special programme dedicated to it.

“I try to make lessons fun and keep my students engaged and interested.”

Woodford County High’s headteacher Jo Pomeroy commented: “It surprises us not at all to see Katie recognised thus.

“She’s a first rate scientist, a creative and highly successful teacher and an energising colleague with whom to work.

“This is already a wonderful achievement and albeit somewhat biased we’re firmly convinced where the ultimate accolade should in due course come to rest.”

The winner will be announced by the Royal Society of Biology later this year.

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