Students explore the world from their desks in Woodford Green

Students at Woodbridge High School were excited to trial the technology

Students at Woodbridge High School were excited to trial the technology - Credit: Archant

Several classes of lucky pupils proved that children really are the future as they were given the chance to trial the latest innovation in virtual reality which could transform how they learn.

Head of geography Jamie Steacy-Buck hands out the headsets to students

Head of geography Jamie Steacy-Buck hands out the headsets to students - Credit: Archant

Students from Woodbridge High School, in St Barnabas Road, Woodford Green, used the latest Google Expedition VR headset on Monday, which allowed them to visit places like Hawaii from the comfort of the classroom.

The headset is designed similarly to binoculars – in a boxed shape with magnified lenses – which lets the user simply hold it to their eyes and see a 360-degree image of any given location.

The pupils clearly enjoyed testing out the kit, with one class of Year 10 audibly gasping when they were transported to an island of volcanoes.

Student Daniel Conwey was very impressed with the expedition and believes it has a lot of potential to transform certain subjects – although the technology did make him feel a little queasy. “It’s really good actually,” he said.

Google Expedition VR headsets

Google Expedition VR headsets - Credit: Archant


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“We looked around Mount Everest, we looked at space – which was really exciting – and under the sea we saw some sea creatures. And we were looking at the seven wonders of the world as well.

“If you’re in a history lesson you are learning about the First and Second World Wars – I think that would definitely be a good history lesson because you get to see how London’s changed.

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“I’d like to see the streets where the blackouts were and how different it was, and maybe Westminster as well because that was quite a popular place to stay in London.”

Jamie Steacy-Buck, head of geography, echoed Daniel’s views on the equipment and believes it will add another string to his bow in the classroom. He said it helps to keep students engaged because it has the wow factor.

“Some of it is brilliant, like the volcanoes because they feel like they are in it. That was a really good one for them to do.

“There’s some things, like oceans where I’ve seen things like coral, you can’t appreciate what it is like in 2-D. It adds another layer.”

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