Search

Newbury Park pupils ‘get hands dirty’ visiting apple orchard

PUBLISHED: 15:10 01 November 2016 | UPDATED: 15:32 01 November 2016

Green-fingered pupils enjoyed gathering the fruits of their labour as they visited an orchard on Monday.
The children from William Torbitt Primary School had an a-peeling time as they tried out bark rubbing and modelled spooky faces for the trees.

Green-fingered pupils enjoyed gathering the fruits of their labour as they visited an orchard on Monday. The children from William Torbitt Primary School had an a-peeling time as they tried out bark rubbing and modelled spooky faces for the trees.

Jo Homan

Green-fingered pupils enjoyed gathering the fruits of their labour as they visited an orchard on Monday.

The children from William Torbitt Primary School had an a-peeling time as they tried out bark rubbing and modelled spooky faces for the trees.

Jo Homan, the education, skills and training manager from The Orchard Project, said the project had been very fruitful.

She said: “The children had a great time getting their hands dirty.

“Some of them didn’t know what an orchard was before they visited.

“We asked the children to try rubbing the bark to create art and held a scavenger hunt.

“On the list were things like sticks, and flowers, which surprisingly they managed to find!

“From their scavenged items, we asked them to create a face for the tree which they could press into clay.

“In the afternoon, they went apple bobbing and then today [Tuesday], the students presented what they learnt to Year 5.”

The children from the school in Eastern Avenue, Newbury Park, were also taught how to respect the orchard, which is beside the old Dick Turpin pub.

Stephanie Irvine from The Orchard Project, said: “I asked the children to tell me how they act around their grandparents or great-grandparents.

“I explained that’s the way they should act around the trees, in order to treat them with respect!”

The site, which is now the Miller & Carter restaurant, Aldborough Road North, Aldborough Hatch, has been chosen by the Heritage Lottery-funded project, for restoration.

The orchard, which is between 80 to 100 years old, currently has one pear tree, some plums, and eight apple trees.

On November 12, the project is inviting volunteers to come and help clear the site.

Adults and accompanied children are invited to help dig out brambles, prune and mulch the trees from 10.30am.

For more information on The Orchard Project, email stephanie@theorchardproject.org.uk.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Ilford Recorder. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Ilford Recorder