Astronaut Tim Peake tweets Snaresbrook school from space

Wren Anderson and her poem for British astronaut Tim Peake. Photo: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School

Wren Anderson and her poem for British astronaut Tim Peake. Photo: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School - Credit: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School

British astronaut Tim Peake tweeted a school last week, calling a poem written by a five-year-old pupil “lovely”.

Tim Peake's tweet to Forest School in Snaresbrook after hearing about Wren Anderson's poem. Photo: J

Tim Peake's tweet to Forest School in Snaresbrook after hearing about Wren Anderson's poem. Photo: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School - Credit: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School

Wren Anderson, pupil at Forest School, College Place, Snaresbrook, wrote the poem about a project she and her classmates are taking part in.

The Campaign for School Gardening project - run by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) - has involved pupils growing two packets of seeds, one of which has been to space.

Hearing about the poem, Tim Peake, sent the school a tweet from the International Space Station (ISS) which said: “Poetry, aliens, science, education and gardening. Lovely!”

As part of Tim’s mission, two kilogrammes of rocket seeds were sent to the ISS and were returned to Earth after six months on board.

Wren Anderson reading her poem for British astronaut Tim Peake to her class. Photo: Jordon-Lee Squib

Wren Anderson reading her poem for British astronaut Tim Peake to her class. Photo: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School - Credit: Jordon-Lee Squibb/Forest School


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The children received two packets of seeds, only one has been into space, and they will find out in a couple of weeks, which one.

Wren’s form teacher, Miss Hopkin said: “It was a wonderful poem by Wren and the whole class listened carefully. The class are really enjoying the seeds from space project. We are nearly half way through our experiment and have a few more measurements to record before we upload our results onto the national database.

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“At the beginning of the experiment the children made predictions.

“Some thought that the seeds would grow the same, a few thought that the seeds that had been to space would not grow or would not grow as much, whilst others thought that the space seeds would grow first.

“Everyone is excited to know the results.”

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