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7/7 10th anniversary: Redbridge police employee remembers ‘eerie’ streets on day of attacks

PUBLISHED: 14:00 07 July 2015

Flowers placed on the King's Cross station sign as a mark of respect to the victims of 7/7. Picture: PA

Flowers placed on the King's Cross station sign as a mark of respect to the victims of 7/7. Picture: PA

PA Archive/Press Association Images

In the face of tragedy, we are reminded what it is to be human.

Well-wishers paying their respects in the flower garden at King's Cross station after 7/7. Picture: Edmond Terakopian/PAWell-wishers paying their respects in the flower garden at King's Cross station after 7/7. Picture: Edmond Terakopian/PA

Tales of heroism and courage run deeply through accounts of the 7/7 bombings, with strangers risking their lives to save others and comforting those horror-struck at what they have witnessed.

Lisa Cherry was one of the many who reached out a hand to someone in need, accompanying a terrified young woman home.

The Redbridge police employee was travelling on the Piccadilly Line between King’s Cross and Russell Square when the train in front of her was blown up by suicide bomber Jermaine Lindsay.

Clutching her young daughter tight, Lisa saw first-hand the chaos and confusion on London’s streets as crowds of people were ushered away from tube stations, left to walk the “eerie” streets.

The scene outside King's Cross station after the explosion on 7/7. Picture: Edmond Terakopian/PAThe scene outside King's Cross station after the explosion on 7/7. Picture: Edmond Terakopian/PA

Speaking on the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks, Lisa said: “I had taken my daughter out of school to do some acting at Great Ormond Street Hospital, where she pretended to be a patient for the students.

“We did what we needed to do, everyone was happy, and we got back on the train.

“It went one stop and then wouldn’t move, so we thought, what’s happening?

“We were told to get off the train and I thought perhaps there had been a crash.”

Railway staff and members of the emergency services preparing to lay floral tributes for the victims of 7/7. Picture: Matthew Fearn/PARailway staff and members of the emergency services preparing to lay floral tributes for the victims of 7/7. Picture: Matthew Fearn/PA

But, with the aftermath of the explosion playing out on the capital’s streets, Lisa realised something serious had occurred.

“I could hear sirens everywhere and there was all this confusion, people walking different ways.

“People were screaming in the street and that’s when I knew something had happened and thought it must have been a bomb.

“I was in a panic thinking where were we going to go and what were we going to do.

“I just knew I had to get my daughter out of there.”

Lisa joined the crowds moving out of the area and came across a young woman in her 20s, who was racked by sobs which left her “almost on the floor”.

“She was shaking and so traumatised by it”, said Lisa. “I looked at her and thought I can’t leave her.”

The woman needed to get back to Chingford, where Lisa lived at the time, and they began making their way home together.

But their ordeal was not over yet.

Lisa said: “We thought we heard another bomb and people started to run.

“I always wonder to myself where the girl came from, I think she may have seen it [the explosion on the Piccadilly Line].

“We walked for ages, I don’t know how long. There were no cars and people were walking in the road.

“Nobody spoke, we were all in shock, and everyone was wandering through London in silence.

“It was eerie.”

Lisa and her daughter went with the woman all the way to her home.

She said: “I took her to her father’s photography shop and she just ran in, I guess with relief that she got there.

“When I got into my house I burst into tears. People don’t realise how traumatising it was.”


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