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Nearly 10,000 Redbridge pensioners set to lose free TV licence under new rules

PUBLISHED: 12:00 10 August 2020

More than 14,000 Havering pensioners are set to lose their right to a free TV licence under new rules introduced on August 1. Picture: Aaron Chown/PA.

More than 14,000 Havering pensioners are set to lose their right to a free TV licence under new rules introduced on August 1. Picture: Aaron Chown/PA.

PA Wire/PA Images

Nearly 10,000 Redbridge pensioners are set to lose their automatic right to a free TV licence.

A House of Commons library analysis has revealed that 9,710 homes in borough will no longer qualify for a free licence under the new means-tested scheme, which came into force on August 1.

The new rules dictate that only households with someone in receipt of pension credit will be eligible; previously anyone aged 75 or over was exempt from the £157.50 annual charge.

Charities and campaigners have said the change will be devastating for many older people, particularly if there is a second wave of coronavirus.

The change is expected to affect around 3.2 million households across Great Britain.

Jan Shortt, general secretary of the National Pensioners Convention, said: “This is devastating for all those people who will now have to find the extra money. We’re particularly concerned about those who are only just over the pension credit limit.

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“They’re the ones who are already making difficult decisions about how they spend their money. For those people their TV is a lifeline.”

Caroline Abrahams, charity director of Age UK, said it was “deplorable” that any older person should face this dilemma.

She urged the BBC and the government to find a way to “keep TV free” for everyone in this age group.

The BBC confirmed it is sending letters to those affected, who will have to either prove their eligibility or pay for a licence.

A BBC spokeswoman said the broadcaster is simply following instructions: “It was the government who decided to stop funding free TV licence fees for the over-75s. The BBC isn’t making any judgements about who is or isn’t poor, as the government sets the criteria for pension credit eligibility.

“Our focus is now on making the transition as safe and easy as possible for all older people.”

She added that 800 call centre staff were working to support customers.

A Department for Culture Media and Sport spokeswoman said the new pension credit criteria was decided by the BBC: “It decided to restrict the concession to only those in receipt of pension credit, and must now look urgently at supporting those affected.”


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