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WW100

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

A curtain was drawn on an era when 111-year-old Harry Patch drew his last breath in 2009.

Valentines Mansion

The stories of the hundreds of Belgian refugees who settled in the borough during the Great War are set to be told.

Reporter Beth Wyatt at the grave of her great-great uncle Sidney Stone, in the Somme. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

As a former history student and the co-ordinator of my team’s First World War centenary coverage, I jumped at the chance to go on the tour.

Teacher Joshua Alford and pupils Raul Simmons-Perez, 16, and Nico Zavrou Blackstock, 16, from East Barnet School, Barnet, with their clay figures. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

After visiting eight cemeteries and memorials, one museum and a commemorative workshop, our tour came to an end.

The group at the Beaumont-Hamel Newfoundland Memorial Park in the Somme. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

On July 1 1916, thousands of soldiers walked across to German lines on the Western Front and began their assaults, confident their enemy had been weakened by a week-long bombardment of 1.6 million shells.

The British ambassador to Belgium, Alison Rose (centre), with the soldiers and pupils at the Menin Gate before the ceremony. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

The fate of British deserters and the stories which lie behind every war grave were among topics considered by the students yesterday.

A British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a comrade. Picture: PA

Sixteen million deaths, 20 million wounded, six million missing. These are the cold, stark facts of the Great War, the world’s first truly modern conflict.

Peter Hodges with the bike his father made and rode until he was 93.  Decorated as part of a flower festival to mark the centenary of World War I at St Paul's Church Woodford Bridge (photo: Arnaud Stephenson)

Peter Hodges stands proudly next to the bike - now entwined with flowers - his father made and rode until he was 93 at a church flower festival.

Image from rehearsals for The Muddy Choir. [Picture: Theatre Centre]

The “lost generation” of the First World War, who sacrificed life and limb in the trenches, are the focus of a new play.

Veterans lowering the colours for fallen comrades during the Ilford service and parade. [Picture: Tony Webb]

The sacrifices of the soldiers of the First World War were captured in moving photographs taken around the borough this week.

Police officers at the Barking Abbey service (pictures: Steve Poston)

Police officers are today set to rally together to remember their predecessors who lost their lives in the First World War.

Alice White with a family photo album

Walking wounded trudge along a barren landscape for miles, feeling the absence of the thick army jackets which have been taken from them and the icy chill of winter drawing ever closer.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

The “war to end all wars” is set to be commemorated through events being held this weekend.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

Residents and organisations are encouraged to help mark the First World War centenary.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

The “war to end all wars” is set to be commemorated through a series of events this summer.

'I said to Sonia

A small, cramped semi in Clayhall is perhaps the last place you would expect to become the target of a letterbomb.

Poppies in South Park, Ilford. [Picture taken by Tony Webb]

This beautiful image of poppies in a meadow was taken by iwitness user Tony Webb.

Redbridge Drama Centre are hosting their first festival of professional theatre, which will go on over 10 days this month

The borough’s first festival of professional theatre kicks off on Thursday.

No.44 Sqn. Hainault Farm aerodrome 1917

Images of gaping bayonet wounds, blown-off limbs and the blood and mud of No Man’s Land are often what spring to mind when thinking about the First World War.

Redbridge Drama Centre are hosting their first festival of professional theatre, which will go on over 10 days this month

Productions seen at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival and a First World War play are set to wow residents in the borough’s first professional theatre festival.

To help you to discover your ancestors who served in the First World War, start your research by visiting Vision RCL’s Redbridge Information and Heritage Service at Redbridge Central Library, Clements Road, Ilford.

Isak Halberstadt (right) with an unknown soldier. Isak survived the war. [Picture: Rabbi David Hulbert]

Two men pose proudly in their new uniforms, ready to do their duty for their country in the First World War.

Committee of Redbridge Music Society: (left to right) Peter Arben, Ian Patience, Malcolm Billingsley and David Bird

The impact of the First World War on the arts is set to be explored at a centenary commemoration event.

Kylie Walsh and Cheryl Allen are part of a project staging a First World War play. They are looking for more people aged 55 and over to take part

Life in the borough over the last 100 years is set to be explored by a community theatre production.

Undated file photo of British infantrymen marching towards the front lines in the River Somme valley. [Picture: PA]

The First World War centenary means it is more important than ever to remember fallen soldiers.

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