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WW100

Wednesday, April 6, 2016
Troops of the British XIV Corps, possibly 5th Division, advancing near Ginchy, during the Battle of Morval, part of the Somme Offensive. Picture: PA

July 1 1916 will forever be immortalised as one of the darkest days in the history of the British Army.

German prisoners at an English prisoners of war camp in France. Picture: Prisoners of the British by Michael Foley

The cruelties of war all too often extend to the streets of the battling nations, with families, homes and livelihoods torn apart by the undiscriminating nature of conflict.

Jackie Morrison's uncle Bill, who fought in the First World War, suffering serious injuries. Two years after the war ended, he killed himself

The outbreak of the First World War heralded a wave of patriotic fervour in summer 1914, with Britain’s men, young and old, smelling the sweet scent of adventure, with the dash of danger they craved.

John Coombes' father George (third from left) with his First World War comrades

Rubble and ash coat cobbled streets, the ghosts of war all too present in a grey landscape where life as it was known has died.

Paul Oliver with a photograph of his father Harry (Henry) Oliver, who survived the First World War

In July 1915, 100 years ago, my father went to Holborn and enlisted in the British Army.

Dresden survivor Hans Haenlein, former flight sergeant Max Bean, Fairlop Heritage Group chairman David Martin, deputy mayor Cllr Linda Huggett and her consort, husband Brian. Picture: Ron Jeffries

The pilots who battled to defend London’s streets from the feared German Zeppelins were remembered at a commemorative ceremony.

Alan Simpson holding his relative Alf's Memorial Plaque - also known as a

Rifle fire pierced the air as sergeants Alfred Cleall and Charles Gibbs set upon the oncoming German troops, ammunition fast exchanging from their comrades’ hands to theirs.

Aeroplanes at Hainault Farm aerodrome in 1917, where 44 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps was based

The pilots who risked and gave their lives battling the Zeppelins which unleashed terror on London’s streets are to be remembered 100 years on.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

Commemorations for the centenary of the First World War continue this year and the Recorder would love to hear your stories.

The group at the Beaumont-Hamel Newfoundland Memorial Park in the Somme. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

A curtain was drawn on an era when 111-year-old Harry Patch drew his last breath in 2009.

Valentines Mansion

The stories of the hundreds of Belgian refugees who settled in the borough during the Great War are set to be told.

Reporter Beth Wyatt at the grave of her great-great uncle Sidney Stone, in the Somme. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

As a former history student and the co-ordinator of my team’s First World War centenary coverage, I jumped at the chance to go on the tour.

Teacher Joshua Alford and pupils Raul Simmons-Perez, 16, and Nico Zavrou Blackstock, 16, from East Barnet School, Barnet, with their clay figures. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

After visiting eight cemeteries and memorials, one museum and a commemorative workshop, our tour came to an end.

The group at the Beaumont-Hamel Newfoundland Memorial Park in the Somme. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

On July 1 1916, thousands of soldiers walked across to German lines on the Western Front and began their assaults, confident their enemy had been weakened by a week-long bombardment of 1.6 million shells.

The British ambassador to Belgium, Alison Rose (centre), with the soldiers and pupils at the Menin Gate before the ceremony. Picture: Erica Spurrier/Equity

The fate of British deserters and the stories which lie behind every war grave were among topics considered by the students yesterday.

A British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a comrade. Picture: PA

Sixteen million deaths, 20 million wounded, six million missing. These are the cold, stark facts of the Great War, the world’s first truly modern conflict.

Peter Hodges with the bike his father made and rode until he was 93.  Decorated as part of a flower festival to mark the centenary of World War I at St Paul's Church Woodford Bridge (photo: Arnaud Stephenson)

Peter Hodges stands proudly next to the bike - now entwined with flowers - his father made and rode until he was 93 at a church flower festival.

Image from rehearsals for The Muddy Choir. [Picture: Theatre Centre]

The “lost generation” of the First World War, who sacrificed life and limb in the trenches, are the focus of a new play.

Veterans lowering the colours for fallen comrades during the Ilford service and parade. [Picture: Tony Webb]

The sacrifices of the soldiers of the First World War were captured in moving photographs taken around the borough this week.

Police officers at the Barking Abbey service (pictures: Steve Poston)

Police officers are today set to rally together to remember their predecessors who lost their lives in the First World War.

Alice White with a family photo album

Walking wounded trudge along a barren landscape for miles, feeling the absence of the thick army jackets which have been taken from them and the icy chill of winter drawing ever closer.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

The “war to end all wars” is set to be commemorated through events being held this weekend.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

Residents and organisations are encouraged to help mark the First World War centenary.

File photo dated 01/11/1915 of a British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place. [Picture: PA]

The “war to end all wars” is set to be commemorated through a series of events this summer.

'I said to Sonia

A small, cramped semi in Clayhall is perhaps the last place you would expect to become the target of a letterbomb.

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